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1984 George Orwell Control Essay

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1984 George Orwell Control Essay

St thomas high school|Control in George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four|||Olivia Magwood|2/16/2010|In many oligarchies, where the power of a society rests in the hands of a little elite group, the government claims outright power and control over the population. Such holds true in George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, where the Celebration maintains control over Oceania and its people. The Party carries out different strategies to affect the population, particularly through the control of language, privacy and individualism, and natural impulses.

The power of language in this book is one of the most potent forces that exists and as a result, the Party goes through terrific lengths to influence and control language. Language is among the most essential ideas that George Orwell includes in Nineteen Eighty-Four. It is of main significance to human thought since it structures and restricts the ideas that individuals have the ability to express. “Do not you see that the whole objective of Newspeak is to narrow the series of believed?

In the end we shall make thoughtcrime literally difficult, because there will be no words in which to reveal it. […] The whole climate of idea will be various. In reality, there will be no idea, as we comprehend it now.” (Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four, 55-56) Orwell proposes that if the Party, the primary form of federal government in this novel, is able to manage language, then they control the loyalty to the Party and the thought of the population. The Celebration manifests its control of language by carrying out the language of Newspeak, developed to replace English.

Changing the extremely structure of language, the Party makes it difficult to think disobedient or rebellious thoughts, because there would be no words with which to think them. The Celebration is constantly refining and perfecting Newspeak, “in the last variation of Newspeak there’ll be nothing else. In the end the whole notion of goodness and badness will be covered by just 6 words– in reality, just one word. Do not you see the appeal of that, Winston? It was B. B.’s idea initially, of course.” (Orwell, 56) The ltimate goal of Newspeak is that no one will be capable of conceiving anything that may question the Party’s outright power. In order to keep outright power, the Party controls the people of Oceania by removing numerous types of privacy. Every person is always based on observation, even by their own family members and friends. Furthermore, because Big Brother is constantly seeing and the Idea Police are always on the lookout, it is impossible for any kind of individualism to thrive. In every room of every family there is a telescreen from which the Thought Police can observe whomever they wish.

This is utilized to keep track of the actions of individuals of Oceania. “There was of course no way of understanding whether you were being seen at any given minute. How typically, or on what system, the Idea Authorities plugged in on any private wire was uncertainty. It was even possible that they watched everybody all the time. But at any rate they could plug in your wire whenever they wanted to. You needed to live– did live, from habit that ended up being impulse– in the assumption that every sound you made was overheard, and, except in darkness, every motion inspected. (Orwell, 4-5) The Party continuously watches for any sign of disloyalty. Winston observes that even a small facial twitch could lead to an arrest, and an individual’s own nervous system can become his biggest opponent. The telescreen likewise provides psychological stimuli through making use of propaganda, designed to overwhelm the mind’s capacity for independent thought. The Celebration uses this tactic to create a society where no individual thinks on their own. “The ideal established by the Party was something big, awful, and flashing […]– three hundred million people all with the same face. (Orwell, 77) This outright control over a person’s privacy, actions and thoughts eliminates all chances for individualism, or ownlife. In Newspeak, “ownlife” implies individualism and eccentricity; a desire to do something for your own advantage such as hobbies, love or other types of idea crime. The Party wants to completely get rid of all aspects of individualism so that total control of the people in society can be kept. Nearly every aspect of the society presented in Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell is controlled, including the most natural impulses of sex and love.

The suppression of these innate prompts is motivated through a program in society that propagates skepticism so serious that even moms and fathers can not trust their own offspring– another allegedly natural bond and impulse. The Celebration weakens household structure by inducting children into companies, such as the Junior Spies. This organization brainwashes the kids and encourages them to spy on their family and neighbours, reporting them for any instances of disloyalty to the celebration. “”Nearly all kids nowadays were terrible.

What was worst of all was that by ways of such organizations as the Spies they were systematically turned into ungovernable little savages, and yet this produced in them no propensity whatever to rebel versus the discipline of the Celebration. On the contrary, they loved the Celebration and whatever connected with it … All their ferocity was turned outwards, against the opponents of the State, versus foreigners, traitors, saboteurs, thought-criminals. It was practically normal for individuals over thirty to be frightened of their own kids.” (Orwell, 26-27) The Celebration likewise forces individuals to reduce their sexual desires.

The Party treats sex simply as a procreative task whose end is the development of new Celebration members. Sexual acts and desire were both rebellion towards the Party. Approval for marital relationship between Party members was constantly declined if the couple gave the impression of being physically drew in to each other. This control over love and relationships made lots of residents of Oceania disappointed, and the Celebration then channels people’s frustration and emotion into intense, relentless displays of hatred versus the Party’s political opponents, such as Goldstein.

This assured the population’s loyalty, causing the inevitable outright control by the Party. Throughout Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell shows how the federal government of Oceania claims outright power and control over a society. The control of language, individualism and personal privacy, and natural impulses ensure that the population stays devoted and unable to devote a defiant criminal activity against the Celebration. Such examples of outright power are what make Nineteen Eighty-Four an exceptional piece of literature, whose message and powerful words of alerting have actually not lost their value today.

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