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A Rose for Emily Essay

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A Rose for Emily Essay

In William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily”, he writes a story that happens in the fictitious town of Jefferson, Mississippi. The story begins with a narrator going over a lady who passed away in her old age, and how her life affected a community. The storyteller states in the story that Miss Emily, through her household history, positions herself above the other members of her neighborhood. He likewise says that she considered herself to be above the law. When her beau, Homer Baron vanishes, everyone in the area thinks that he moved away, but in truth Miss Emily kills him and keeps him in her house so that they can constantly be together.

With no regard to the laws against murder, she thinks just of her joy. “A Rose for Emily” implies that trying to be above the law will always wreak devastating effects for those who attempt. Miss Emily Grierson was a female who was born into what was perceived to be an abundant household. She was raised in an upper class home that her popular family owned. Her dad was believed to be economically safe, but when he passed away, it was proven that the only thing that was left to Miss Emily was your house.

She was in truth “left alone, and a pauper” (Faulkner 30). The mayor, at the time of her daddy’s death, was Colonel Sartoris. After her father died Colonel Sartoris had actually “remitted her taxes” and he had “created the tale, to the result that Miss Emily’s daddy had lent cash to the town, which the town preferred this way of paying back” (Faulkner 29). Ten years after the death of Colonel Sartoris the town approached Miss Emily and attempted to encourage her that she required to pay her taxes.

She safeguarded herself stating, “See Colonel Sartoris, I have no taxes in Jefferson” (Faulkner 30). Miss Emily’s refusal to pay the taxes even though Sartoris had actually been dead for many years showed that she did not need to follow the laws because she thought herself above the law. In the story, a male with a building business entered into town and started courting Miss Emily. During their courtship, everybody felt that she had actually finally found herself a spouse, but they likewise saw that Homer had not been around for a while.

One day Miss Emily went to the drug store to buy some toxin, and the druggist informed her that by law he had to understand why she was buying it and she declined to tell him. The druggist took it upon himself to write on the bottle that the poison was acquired “For Rats” (Faulkner 32). When Homer had actually returned to Jackson he was only seen in town for one day, never to be seen once again. Sixty years later, the day after Miss Emily had actually been buried the townspeople were in her home.

Upon investigating the items in the home, the townspeople went into a bedroom and found a dead man lying in the space. The man was Homer Baron, and on the pillow next to him were an indentation where her head had actually rested and a single strand of Miss Emily’s hair. In conclusion, Miss Emily considered herself as being much better than everyone else and never ever held herself liable for any of her actions. Her refusal to pay taxes, the purchase of the poison, and finally the murder and keeping Homer’s body without informing anyone, proves her belief that the laws did not pertain to her.

Although the town viewed her to be a poor but a great woman, her actions after her death altered the understanding of how she would be kept in mind. Miss Emily’s devastating habits permanently revealed the destructive effects of her actions and the town always remembered her as being a murderer who never ever followed any guidelines. Works Cited Faulkner, William. A Rose for Emily. Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Ed. X. J. Kennedy and Dana Gioia. 8th ed. New York: Longman,2004. 28-34.

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