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A Rose For Emily Marxist Theory

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A Rose For Emily Marxist Theory

Summary of A Rose For Emily

No 1 Vanessa No Ms. Pate American Lit– Honors 4 September 2014 Social Class and Isolation in “A Rose for Emily” “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner is a narrative about the life of a female with a tragic story. Faulkner’s interpretation on social class appears in the story as it centers around on the lives of townspeople who are obsessed with a Southern female. The town’s social interaction and conflict with Emily is one of the reasons that she has shut herself out from their community. The Marxist criticism theory enables one to comprehend that the material truths of he economy are the bases of social change and conflict. This approach exposes that financial status is a main element in this literary work as it structures the society in the story. From the point of view of the Marxist theory, “A Rose for Emily” displayshows s that class impacts and influences the town’s interactions and thoughts about others, leading to Miss Emily’s alienation. According to the Marxist theory, each character represents a social class and a number of the actions in the story stress where each of them stand. In a small town of Jefferson, Miss Emily Grierson is a widely known woman.

Miss Emily had the image of a grand lady whose family history and track record required terrific respect; for that reason it is said that she had been “a custom, a responsibility, and a care; a sort of genetic commitment upon the town” (592 ). However, despite the fact that the lineage of Miss Emily Grierson had deep roots in the community, she was anything but a regular citizen. Since she had a really controlling dad who pushed away any guys that attempted to get close to her, Miss Emily was left alone after her father’s death and she ostracizes herself from the town by having a minimal contact with the outdoors world: “after her daddy’s death she headed out

No 2 very little (…) individuals hardly saw her at all” (594 ). She continues to separate herself from the world outside; the only interaction she has is with Homer Barron and her home keeper, Tobe. Her discrimination and her ostracism is a result of the neighborhood’s failure to see Miss Emily as a regular resident and the Griersons become a disgrace to the town, particularly when the working class northerner, Homer Barron, starts wooing her. Throughout the entire story, the storyteller portrays how the social classes connect with each other when the townspeople have subjective and distorted analyses of Miss Emily whom they know little about. They see Miss Emily more as a spectacle than an actual human being looking for happiness in life; they stop working to have compassion with her. When the townspeople attend her funeral, the neighborhood depicts her as an unwanted and mysterious things they wish to check out more than a just recently deceased person: “the males through a sort of considerate attention for a fallen monolith, the women primarily out of interest to see the within her house” (592 ). The townspeople, but mostly the women attend her funeral simply to benefit their wn interest; it gave them a reason to look around her house to see how Miss Emily had lived. Additionally, for the majority of the story, Emily is just seen from a distance, by people who watch her through the windows or who glance at her in her entrance. The narrator refers to her as an item, “like the carven upper body of an idol in a specific niche” (598 ). An idol is worshiped, and generally a feared item, and because Emily remains in the window, she was displayed “in a niche.” The town’s obsession with observing Miss Emily’s life even more unfolds after she is seen with Homer Barron.

Many people in the area would chatter about her saying how she came from a greater class which “it was a disgrace to the town and a bad example to the young people” for her to be associated to him (596 ). Nobody comprehends or knows the Emily that exists beyond what they can see. They are only able to see her true self just after she passes away and her secrets are revealed. No 3 Moreover, it appears that the town’s absence of compassion was the reason that Miss Emily picked to alienate herself from society. When her father’s death had been announced, “that as when individuals had started to feel actually sorry for her,” however this compassion is soon lived (595 ). The town “provides condolence [s] and aid, as in [their] customized,” but only since it was a social rule to use their help (595 ). Their absence of real empathy and incorrect sincerity for Miss Emily and her knowledge of it was among the elements that led to her alienation and, as a result, her inability to move on in time. The stress between the brand-new and the old lead to Emily’s failure to deal with change. She has to conquer her controlling daddy, a meddlesome town, and her own social awkwardness.

And a lot more due to the fact that she has no loan, she can not be incorporated into the development of the town. That is why “when the next generation, with its more contemporary ideas, became mayors and aldermen, [the] arrangement developed some little dissatisfaction” (594 ). In a neighborhood where social requirements are constantly progressing induced by the establishing political and technological nation, Miss Emily was left as she remained in her southern tradition and culture. The town is really vital about upholding ones credibility in one’s social class and doesn’t really agree with those who like to stay in custom.

The town’s inability to show Miss Emily any type of empathy represents them as a society that has actually grown to expect an amazing scene from Miss Emily in which her emotions are neglected and are insignificant to them. By examining “A Rose for Emily” through the perspective lens of the Marxist Theory, one can see that the conflict in the story, specifically between the town and Miss Emily, was because of the distinctions in financial status and social class. The beliefs that the townspeople shared were very criticizing as they thought their self-respect and value was in their image and reputation, and nstead of embracing Miss Emily as one of their own, they alienated her from their society by No 4 being crucial and scrutinizing everything that she did. Miss Emily isolated herself by selecting to stay in a town where she couldn’t suit. The Marxist theory enables one to comprehend that humans end up being separated by their households, by their community, by custom, by law, by the past, and by their own actions and options. No 5 Functions Cited Faulkner, William. “A Rose for Emily.” 1993. Aspects of Literature: Literature of the United States, 5th Course. Florida: Holt Rinehart and Winston, 1993. 592+. Print.

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