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An Analysis of the Conclusion to Wuthering Heights

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An Analysis of the Conclusion to Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights Conclusion As we discovered in class from the group presentation, the purpose of gothic literature is to stimulate emotions of fear and horror, along with break social norms. Common image and images include specters, ghosts, and devils, in addition to dim lighting or eerie settings. Styles of gothic literature consist of unpredictability and the examination of the nature of power, law, society, household and sexuality that usually build to an excellent climax.

Wuthering Heights is an excellent example of all of those elements, but unlike a lot of Gothic romances, I do not believe that Wuthering Heights constructs to an intense and violent climax prior to its ending. Instead, I believe the stress in the novel unfolds as the inner conflict within Heathcliff slowly liquifies, as his love for Catherine reduces his yearning for vengeance on his dead oppressors’ children. Although the novel’s delighted ending is not possible until Heathcliff’s death, his authority ends up being less threatening in the days that precede his death.

As time passes, Heathcliff becomes increasingly obsessed with his dead love Catherine, and finds consistent tips of her everywhere he turns. He starts speaking with her ghost, and, after his climactic night on the moors he is conquered with an unexpected sense of cheer, and he has a happy premonition of his own upcoming death. This part of the unique makes me extremely suspicious about what happened at the moors to cause Heathcliffs change of attitude. The text regularly compares Heathcliff to the Devil, but he does not think in Hell.

His required education of faith as a kid triggered him to deny the existence of Heaven, and his absence of faiths appeared to cause him not fear death. I think death for Heathcliff symbolizes one thing: the beginning of his reunion with Catherine. I believe the idea of this reunion with Catherine even stimulates excitement for Heathcliff, which offers him the pleased premonition of death. I believe the marriage in between Cathy and Hareton, signifies the start of a brand-new life and completion of anxiety and disparity in the book.

I also believe the marital relationship represents the power love needs to get rid of hardships and prevail. The marital relationship in between Cathy and Hareton causing a happy ending is likewise foreshadowing of the concept that had Catherine and Heathcliff been allowed to marry, the violence and vengeance seen in the 2nd half of the book might not have actually occurred. I think that the reunion of Catherine and Heathcliff’s ghosts is a fitting piece to the pleased ending of the novel, showing again that true love dominates, for better or for even worse.

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