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Analysis of Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

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Analysis of Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

ANDRADE, Maria Ana Ruth D. L. M. A. Ed. Literature Things Break Down By Chinua Achebe “I fear for you young people since you do not comprehend how strong is the bond of kinship. You do not know what it is to speak with one voice. And what is the outcome? An abominable religious beliefs has settled amongst you. A male can now leave his dad and his brothers. He can curse the gods of his fathers and his ancestors, like a hunter’s pet dog that unexpectedly freaks and switches on his ancestors, like a hunter’s dog that unexpectedly freaks and switches on his master.

I fear for you; I fear for the clan.” Things Fall Apart is an African novel written in 1958. The text above was revealed by an old native of Mbanta, the motherland of Okonkwo. When Okonkwo was banished for seven years from Umuofia due to a “female” crime, his homeland was significantly affected by the newcomers, the Whites. These Westerners introduced Christianity and a brand-new kind of federal government to the Africans. Nevertheless, this Western culture triggered chaos to the villagers of Umuofia. A few of them accepted the new culture and some were against it.

So the text above was stating that the youth had actually changed and ended up being easily influenced by new appealing things like Christianity and the White’s public law. The speaker believed that this was one element why “things” fell apart in Umuofia. The unique Things Break down is a postcolonial text. Aside from being composed after Africa achieved its independence from the Whites, the text resolves the matters of postcolonial identity which involves the exploitation of the Africans by the Whites utilizing faith and brand-new laws (Fischer-Tine, 2010).

The Whites had a very sensible method of sending missionaries first to introduce Christianity rather of using violence that results in forced capturing of the land. They persuaded individuals to believe their faith so that when they establish laws, the Africans would respond according to the faith instructed on them which taught the worth of obedience and commitment “their” God and “His guys’s” laws. The novel demonstrate how a more well-informed race can make the most of another. Due to the fact that the Whites understood more about colonization, and government, they effectively persuaded a number of Africans to assist them in claiming power over Umuofia.

While the Whites were executing their colonizing tactics, Okonkwo who represented the villagers who thought that the Whites were the enemy, the evil who respected the tribe’s religion (paganism) and laws, expressed his objectives initially by persuading his fellowmen to drive the Westerners away and second by killing a White guy when he failed to do the previous. The text might be thought about postmodern due to the fact that Achebe leads the readers to think that there is no wish for the Africans after Okonkwo killed himself.

Fear exists in the 3rd part of the book which suggests that a search for order (Lewis, 2001) to the chaos in between the Whites and Africans, Christianity and Paganism, White laws and African laws, is useless or absurd. The frustrating ending- the death of Okonkwo showed the hopeless scenario of the people in Umuofia. It was not only because of the Whites that they fell apart but likewise for the reason that they themselves- their beliefs, laws broke down because of the fragility of the identity of a number of them.

This fragility of identity is described the young generation who were addressed by the quotations above. Another indicator to prove the text’s postmodernism aspect is the presence of irony (Lewis, 2001) in the fate of Okonkwo. He was considered among the prominent males in Umuofia. He got a title at a young age and he was a highly regarded warrior and farmer. While he carried these favorable impressions of others, he lived with a stone heart. He never showed his genuine sensations towards his family. This appeared when he was forced to eliminate Ikemefuna, his adopted boy whom he was very fond of, because of the tribal law.

This strong adherence to patriarchal beliefs likewise led Okonkwo to lose his title and admired track record. His strength which was established by the belief on manly strength alone toward success was likewise the reason for his fall. Referrals: Fischer-Tine, Harald (2010 ). Postcolonial Studies. Retrieved from http://www. ieg-ego. eu/en/threads/ europe-and-the- world/postcolonial-studies/harald-fischer-tine-postcolonial-studies on 12 September 2012. Lewis, Barry. (2001 ). “Postmodernism and Literature”. The Routledge Buddy to Postmodernism. Ed. Stuart Sim. London and New York: Routledge.

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