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Jane Eyre Mystery and Suspense

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Jane Eyre Mystery and Suspense

Go Over how Charlotte Bronte produces secret and suspense in Jane Eyre. Mystery and thriller play a crucial part in developing an environment for the reader and foreshadowing coming events. Bronte establishes an air of mystery and suspense throughout the book; from Jane Eyre and Mr Rochester’s first conference to the expose of Bertha. She uses numerous methods to develop this atmosphere, engaging the reader and crafting a really reliable plot. Bronte subtly uses aptronyms to generate a mysterious feel for the reader– for instance, ‘Thornfield’.

A ‘thorn’ is the sharp predicting point on a plant, and by utilizing this, Bronte foreshadows the hard time Jane has at Thornfield. This name likewise makes the reader curious, as it is an uncommon and quite unfavorable name. Bronte sustains the reader’s curiosity throughout the meeting between Mr Rochester and Jane Eyre. The setting of the hill top path with the ‘increasing moon’ and ‘outright hush’ constructs a photo of a very quiet, isolated location in the reader’s mind. This setting is generally used in other stories when something bad will occur, so the thriller is high here.

Jane’s memories of Bessie’s tales about the ‘Gytrash’ add terror to the scene, where an onlooker would see none. Bronte also gets in touch with the reader’s senses; ‘a tramp tramp, a metallic clatter’ and ‘a rush under the hedge’. By not specifying what the sounds are made by, it produces a very mysterious and unnerving scenario which the reader is drawn into. Bronte extends this idea with the structure of the sentences. In this paragraph, the sentences are long but with a great deal of punctuation for pauses. For example, ‘It was extremely near, but not yet in sight; when, in addition to the tramp, tramp, I heard a rush under the hedge. This reflects Jane’s thought procedure; she fidgets so her ideas are broken and fleeting. The description of Mr Rochester likewise includes secret. He is ‘covered in a riding cloak’, ‘had a dark face, with stern functions’ and ‘substantial breadth of chest’. This suggests a deceptive character, which Bronte likewise portrays through the dialogue in between him and Jane. Rochester’s actions to Jane’s questions are short and abrupt,” Can you tell me where he is?’ ‘I can not.” This makes it look like he has something to hide, which the reader later on finds out is his identity.

In addition, the fact that he reacts with ‘I can not’ may seem odd to the reader (a normal reaction might be more apologetic and less conclusive.) When it is exposed, to Jane and the reader, that the tourist was Mr Rochester, it makes the reader interested regarding why he would keep his identity trick when he satisfied Jane earlier in the chapter. This increases the mystical atmosphere. Charlotte Bronte utilizes gothic features in her description of Thornfield, to enhance the readers sensation of suspense. The reader gets a sense of the building when Mrs Fairfax states ‘nobody ever sleeps here’.

This is followed up by Jane’s reference of any ‘ghosts’ ‘legends or ghost stories’. This provides the structure as a rather big, however empty, spooky location. In this description, Thornfield is likewise provided as almost a prison– ‘trapdoor’, ‘attic … as black as a vault’ and ‘rows of little black doors all shut’ compared to the ‘sunlit scene of grove, pasture and green hill’ that Jane views from the roof of Thornfield. This relate to the reveal of Bertha Mason later, as she was basically a detainee in Thornfiel.

Bronte also produces secret and thriller through intertextuality. This provides the text numerous layers and foreshadows events later in the book. To start with, Jane states ‘after life’s fitful fever they sleep well’ which is a quote from Macbeth. By linking the scene to the play, Bronte links Thornfield with the styles in Macbeth (deceptiveness, disaster, murder etc.) and foreshadows happenings later on in the book. Secondly, Bronte relates the passages in Thornfield ‘like a corridor in some Bluebeard’s castle. The French folktale ‘Bluebeard’ (released 1697) informs the story of a violent nobleman, in the practice of murdering his other halves, and the attempt of one spouse to prevent the fate of her predecessors. This associates with Mr Rochester, keeping his other half Bertha Mason in the attic, while proposing to Jane. Readers who understand of the folk tale will pick up on this recommendation and be interested regarding how this associates with the ‘Jane Eyre’. Towards completion of Chapter 11, Mrs Fairfax says to Grace Poole ‘Remember directions!’ By not expressing what the instructions are, Bronte makes the reader wonder what they are, creating mystery.

Perhaps the moment including the most thriller in the book, is the scene at the wedding of Rochester and Jane, in which Bronte gradually exposes the existence of Rochester’s previous better half. By having numerous characters speaking in the exact same scene, Bronte makes the event very significant and frenzied. This keeps the reader engaged and it nearly makes them check out at the speed the scene would be happening. This provides a real sense of how rapidly the mystery is unwinding. The expose of Bertha Mason is the chapter where all the mystery comes together.

Bronte composes ‘the low, black door’ which connects to earlier on in the book, and shows how these black doors are really a form of imprisonment for Bertha. She continues the thriller as ‘he [Rochester] lifted the hangings from the wall, revealing the second door’. This powerful description makes the reader seem like they are in the scene, and are likewise awaiting the reveal of Bertha Mason. In conclusion, I feel that Charlotte Bronte produces mystery and suspense in Jane Eyre very successfully. By numerous techniques, she manages to bring the reader into the story, making for a really fascinating plot.

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