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Lord of the Flies Psychoanalysis

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Lord of the Flies Psychoanalysis

Lord of the Flies Psychoanalysis In Lord of the Flies, the three main characters embody the various elements of the human mind although it may not appear at first. The three elements of the human psyche consist of the Id, the part of the mind concerned with pleasing impulses; the Superego, the part that attempts to control the Id and focus on responsibility; and the Ego, the conscious mind that stabilizes the Id and the Superego. Each of the 3 primary characters, Jack, Ralph, and Piggy, represent among these aspects of the human psyche in Lord of the Flies through their actions and options they make.

Jack embodies the Id; only worried about satisfying his impulses. For instance, when Ralph discusses a fire Jack immediately says “Begin! Follow me! “( 38 ). He spares no idea for the consequences of his actions. Jack provides no thought to the unfinished shelters that they frantically require. He has a fixation with killing a pig which ultimately manifests into a “obsession to locate and eliminate that was swallowing him up. “( 51 ). He has a single-minded impulse and killing a pig would satisfy his impulse.

When he finally makes his first kill he feels happy. He says, “Look! We’ve killed a pig,” (69 ). His impulse ended up being controlled for a bit till he went out to hunt again. After his next kill, Jack descended into savagery, to become ruled solely by his impulses. An example of his inhibitions would be when “The chief [Jack] led then, trotting steadily, exulting in his achievement. He was a chief now in fact; and he made stabbing motions with his spear. From his left hand hung Piggy’s damaged glasses. (168 ). After Jack assaults the camp to steal Piggy’s glasses, Ralph and Piggy recognize that the last symbol of civilization, the conch, has actually ended up being unimportant to the others on the island. Piggy embodies the Superego; he focuses on duty. He attempts to manage Jack, the Id, and keep him from surrendering to his impulses. For instance, when Piggy states, “I got the conch, you let me speak! “( 42 ). it reveals that he still appreciates the rules of civilization. On the island, Piggy ends up being the voice of factor.

He “estimates to the spoil-sport who “robs the play of its impression. “(Rosenfield 4). by trying to keep order. He thinks in dealing with scenarios properly in order to achieve a smooth success. When Piggy says “Just you listen! The very first thing we ought to have made was shelters … how can you expect to be saved if you do not put very first things first and act correct? “( 45 ). He knows that they should remain civilized or they will not have a chance for redemption. Piggy represents the closest thing the young boys have to a dad figure on the island since of his understanding.

In the words of Claire Rosenfield, “Like the dad, he counsels good sense … when they scuttle off at every unclear whim, he scornfully comments “like a pack of kids. “(Rosenfield 3). Ralph embodies the Ego; he functions as the arbitrator on the island between the Id and the Superego, or Jack and Piggy. For instance, when Jack and Piggy battle over the conch, Ralph says, “Jack! Jack! You haven’t got the conch! Let him speak. “( 91 ). Ralph likes order and he does not like battling and dispute. When he goes to Castle Rock to ask Jack for Piggy’s specifications back, he tries to do so in a neutral, compromising way to avoid battling.

Likewise, when all of the boys initially fulfill up on the beach Ralph says, “Seems to me we ought to have a chief to choose things. “( 22 ). This shows that he wants order and that he wishes to avoid conflict by having individuals vote rather of somebody just choosing they will end up being leader since they want to do so. Moderating comes naturally to him. As the young boys gather on the beach in the beginning of the book to decide how to continue, Ralph demonstrates this natural capability when “He [Ralph] rested on a fallen trunk, his left side to the sun.

On his right were the majority of the choir; on his left the larger kids who had actually not understood each other before the evacuation; before him little kids squatted in the lawn. “( 32 ). He brings groups of various people together and makes them learn more about each other and get along. Word Count: 718 Functions Cited Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. New York City: The Berkley Publishing Group, 1954. Print. The Taboo, Flower’s Literary Themes. N. p.: n. p., n. d. Blossom’s Literary Recommendation Online. Web. 12 Apr. 2013.

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