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The Lottery: Setting Analysis

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The Lottery: Setting Analysis

Shirley Jackson’s The Lottery is a short story filled with ironies. The title itself currently gives a contrary significance to the very first thing that pertains to the reader’s minds. The Lottery game in this story describes the custom in which the winner of the lottery would be stoned to death. This is divergent to what we initially think when we hear the word lottery game; winning a huge quantity of money. The story starts with a clear and thorough description of the town square in which the story is set.

It begins, “The early morning of June 27th was a clear and bright, with rest warmth of a complete summertime day; the flowers were blossoming profusely and the yard was highly green.” This suggests an ambiance of joy and happiness in the air. It portrays a typical summertime’s day in a typical town, but as the story goes on the readers will see that something contrary to this IS about to take place. Shirley Jackson begins her story by explaining a common summer morning. Here, absolutely nothing Out Of the ordinary arises which establishes the paradox of the story.

She mentions that the school was simply recently over for mummer break giving the children the liberty to run around and play. She describes the turf as “richly green” and the flowers “blossoming a lot’ seeming tranquility to the readers. With these words, Shirley creates a serene environment where you would least anticipate anything dark to happen. The story being set in the town square already hints on how important the lottery needs to be to the townspeople.

The town square being between the bank and the post office likewise gives us a concept on how small the town is, as everything of significance is set near to each other. In addition, it is discussed that there were only about three hundred individuals collected in the stated place. Eventually, Shirley offers us small tips on what is to occur in the town square. She discusses Bobby Martin, Harry Jones and Choose Dielectric making a terrific pile of stones which recommends the imminent fate of the lottery game “winner.” Soon the men and females gather talking and gossiping.

The entrance of the black box then alters the atmosphere as the townspeople become uneasy. The mood then alters from relaxing to threatening. Through developing a quiet and tranquil setting, Shirley conceals the menacing truth of what the lottery actually is. By pointing out the stones she prefigures the iniquitous and disturbing ending of the story. As the story advances, the environment ends up being more and more uneasy, however oddly enough the mindset of the townspeople remains the exact same even as they stone Testis to death.

It appears that the idea of stoning an innocent to death does not bother them since it is a tradition. Contrary to the serene sensation that the setting produces in the beginning, the story ends with a harsh act of stoning a guiltless person to death. This shows the setting’s considerable function of producing a paradox in the story. Undoubtedly, Shirley Jackson proves her skills as she produces a story filled with paradoxes that makes her work even more exciting to read regardless of the glumness Of it. It reveals her artistry in hiding the truth from her readers by developing a setting that contradicts the plot of the story.

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