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Things Fall Apart and Exile

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Things Fall Apart and Exile

Last Essay Overview I. Introduction A. Exile can be the self-imposed banishment from one’s house or offered as a kind of punishment. Exile leads to solitude; leaving individuals just time to reflect upon their self. B. The primary characters in The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Tempest, and Things Fall Apart all encounter exile due to their actions. C. THESIS)– The lead characters, Gilgamesh, Prospero, and Okonkwo all have experiences of exile which alienate them from their homeland, but as painful as it is for them to go through; their experience alienates them causing them to get rid of trials and improves their lives in such a way that exposes their real character. D. Each character has a various experience of exile, but it triggers them all to deal with the effects it brings; revealing their true inner self. II. First Protagonist’s Exile– Gilgamesh A. Gilgamesh’s exile experience is one that is brought upon by his own free choice and is a spiritual and emotional experience. He is a king who is selfish, has no empathy for other individuals, and only wishes to use his power to take from others. “Gilgamesh was a tyrant to his individuals” (Mason 15). 2. Through relationship, Gilgamesh learns that he can look after somebody besides himself. He finds out friendship can make him more powerful and more positive. “Gilgamesh was specific with his pal next to him” (Mason 31). B. His experience of exile leaves him alone with grievance as his only companion. 1. Gilgamesh is “conquered with pain” and chooses to enter into solitude after the death of his friend, Enkidu. Mason 60). 2. He abandons the world he likes which has plenty of desire, wealth, power, and satisfaction and starts a journey to seek eternal life, hoping to change the fate of his own death. C. Gilgamesh’s experience of exile is improving due to the fact that it brings him to be more human-like; efficient in feeling emotion (love, sorrow, remorse, unhappiness). 1. His best friend teaches him that he can naturally take care of others and express his emotions. 2. Gilgamesh reveals his emotions when” [He] wept bitterly for his friend” (Mason 53). D.

The exile Gilgamesh encounters teaches him a valuable lesson that an individual can not escape their own death and he can still keep the memory of his best friend. He has a brand-new outlook on life and does not take pride in the worldly goals. It is a humbling experience and he goes back to his kingdom with a new discovered appreciation for his people’s work. E. Gilgamesh’s experience of exile enables the reader to relate through the typical feeling of sorrow. III. Second Lead character’s Exile– Prospero A. In The Tempest, Prospero’s exile is one that is required upon by the jealousy and treacherous act of his own bro, Antonio. Sutton argues that Prospero’s story is extremely comparable to that of Joseph from the book of Genesis. 2. “Joseph and Prospero parallel each other as victims of jealous brother or sisters” (Sutton 225). B. Prospero’s exile leaves him stranded on an island for twelve years with just the business of his child and his two servants. 1. He uses his time in exile to once again end up being a powerful ruler of his new area. 2. “They ultimately end up being de facto rulers of their adopted land, using their natural capabilities integrated with supernatural forces to acquire power” (Sutton 225). C.

In spite of Prospero’s betrayal by his own sibling; he seeks to forgive him rather of selecting vengeance. 1. When it is time to face his brother, Prospero informs Antonio “I do forgive Thy rankest fault, all of them” (Shakespeare V. i. 151-152). 2. Forgiveness is another resemblance between Prospero and Joseph “… in both works the protagonists eventually forgive their bros” (Sutton 227). D. The experience of exile brings back Prospero’s dukedom, however just after seeking forgiveness. He has the ability to set himself devoid of the vengeful acts that were cast upon him and bring back goodness within his self and others.

E. In the beginning of the play, Prospero’s exile leads the reader to believe he is seeking vengeance, but in the end his exile belongs of a bigger theme which is forgiveness. IV. Third Protagonist– Okonkwo A. Okonkwo’s exile crazes Break down is much different than that of Gilgamesh and Prospero’s in that it is a result of his own actions. 1. He is exiled by his clansmen when he dedicates a female criminal offense, eliminating another clansman by mishap (Achebe 124). 2. The only course of action Okonkwo can take is to comply with the laws of Umuofia and leave his native land for 7 years

B. The exile Okonkwo deals with only includes more to his anger and bitterness. Okonkwo’s alienation triggers him to have a pessimistic outlook, focusing more on what has been drawn from him. 1. Although he is glad for the welcoming of his mom’s kinsmen, Okonkwo regrets every day of his exile (Achebe 162). C. Okonkwo does not learn anything from his exile, however reverts back to his survival abilities and hard work to “succeed in his motherland” (Achebe 162). D. Okonkwo is the only protagonist that did not alter from his experience.

His experience of exile exposes no change of his downhearted outlook and just hardens his heart more. When he returns home, his actions show that he is meaner, angrier, and more defiant. E. Okonkwo’s experience of exile leaves a stunning ending with Okonkwo taking his own life. V. Conclusion A. The experience of exile can lead an individual through a dark tunnel, however it does not mean that there can not be light at the end. B. Gilgamesh, Prospero, and Okonkwo each portray how when taken from their homeland, exile is a hurtful experience, but it can likewise enhance their lives and expose their true character.

C. The experience of exile, in the stories of The Legendary of Gilgamesh, The Tempest, and Things Break down, assists reveal the primary plot of the texts and the characters. Functions Cited Achebe, Chinua. Things Break Down. New York City: First Anchor Books Edition, 1994. Print. Mason, Herbert. Gilgamesh A Verse Narrative. New York: Houghton Mifflin Business, 2003. Print. Shakespeare, William. The Tempest. Ed. Barbara A. Mowat & & Paul Werstine. New York City: Simon & & Schuster Paperbacks, 1994. Print Sutton, Brian. “Virtue Instead Of Vengeance”: Genesis and Shakespeare’s The Tempest” Explicator. 66. 4 (2008 ): 224-229. Print.

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