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Winston 1984: Character Analysis of Winston Smith

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Winston 1984: Character Analysis of Winston Smith

Character Analysis Of Winston Smith. Winston is the primary character in this novel and he seems to be separated from all of the other characters in the book by his thoughts. It is Winston’s uncommon character that we see unfolding as we read through the novel. He seems to be the only one set apart from the rest of the characters. Through Winston’s eyes and ideas, the reader acquires an idea of the new society, which has no location for flexibility, truth, or human emotions. The uncommon Winston makes the reader hate the society that he is residing in.

1984 Character Analysis Of Winston

In fact, the reader is made to empathize with all of his ideas and sensations about the Celebration and the society developed by it. The reader recognizes that Winston is various than most of his peers. He stubbornly holds on to his human spirit, the thing the Party most wants to break in him, while everyone else is brain-washed to think whatever they are told. In a society where everybody is simply existing and fulfilling the Party’s dreams, Winston continues to think, concern, love, and seem like all complimentary people should.

Through Winston 1984 character, Orwell represents a common man’s struggle to retain his identity, sanity, and natural rights in a society that is filled with worry, solitude, and insecurity. Winston is depicted as a man who just wishes to satisfy his natural advises and discover peace. He has the ability to do this for a short while, through Julia, however the sensation of joy can not continue since it is prohibited to Big Bro. As an outcome, Winston is detained, imprisoned, and tortured.

Orwell’s ability makes the reader identify with Winston’s pain, torture, and brainwashing in jail. He responds much like any commoner would respond, and in the end, he appears to be completely broken and beat. After he is declared “healed” by the Celebration and “released” to the outside, Winston sees Julia once again and understands, in spite of his brainwashing and statements to the Celebration, he still feels love for her. Such emotion can not be tolerated by Huge Brother; as a result, the Celebration eliminates Winston.

In Winston 1984, Orwell has actually produced a combonation of the common and unusual in humanity. Every reader is able to identify with him and experience his discomfort and pain, triggered by residing in a society where life is controlled like any other machine and where all ideas and actions are controlled by the Big Brother. He is likewise a terrible figure, who suffers beyond endurance and deals with total failure in the hands of Big Brother.

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